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...a selection of poetry, lyrics and random thoughts.

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'nursery rhymes' by Kelsey wedeen
 
 
barbie dolls and pink plastic race cars
dressing this world up in lace and frills
covering up her tears with movie star glasses
masking the scent of death
with heavy perfume.
lipstick piled heavy on her lips,
solitude is heavy in her heart.
we played make believe like a drug
waiting for reality to slip away. Say goodnight
to our babydoll eyes
tucked into our cradles,
smiles creeping to the corners our mouths,
to the corner of your soul I wandered through
wearing my moms stiletto heals
and baggy pantyhose,
stuffing my shirt with four pairs of socks
and waiting for Ken to notice me.
but our smiles went so much deeper than plastic
and the blood that we bleed is warm and inviting.
the cycle of life had ceased in her belly
and left her alone in the chill of reality.
she never would play with the baby dolls.
she said she had nothing to give.
she said that the babies seemed real to her,
like their eyes were pleading with hers,
like their eyes were crying with hers...
wrapping them in lingerie and burring their little plastic bodies
she left their eyes open as she laid them to their death.
pretty girls in pretty boxes
we painted our own disillusionment in cotton candy pink
pink hearts
and blood...
barbie dolls covered in her blood,
making all the other girls cry,
and all the baby's eyes are searching
around the room,
looking for the lace and frills,
looking for their mother's arms,
their mother's breast,
their mother's smile,
and all the baby's arms
are reaching from their graves,
reaching for you,
he's reaching for you...
 
 
 
 
I have written many poems in my past but "nursery rhymes" was one of the most difficult to complete. I found it challenging to have to create something on the spot that came from my heart and then put it down on paper for an assignment. I enjoyed the pressure as much as I loathed it and found that although I wasn't always completely satisfied with the piece, I was still inspired to push through and keep working on it.
After hearing the class responses to my rough draft I decided to basically leave the poem as it was but add a couple of lines for clarity. I also decided to write the whole poem in lower case letters to give the reader a sense of child like innocence.
I wrote "nursery rhymes" with two specific females in mind. The first one is my best friend who had a miscarriage in high school and the second is my ex-boyfriend's little sister who is just fourteen and went through an abortion last week. I watched two very young girls go through very adult experiences and it hurt me to know how alone they both felt going through it. I think it's so important to get more female poetry, art, books, music and just plain information out to women young and old because I know first hand what it feels like to be alone and confused. I remember the first time I heard Ani Difranco sing. It felt like somebody reached into my head and pulled the thoughts right out. It was the first time I ever felt truly connected to my sex and most of all, understood. I tried to accomplish this same sort of feeling in my poem and I think I did on some lines but over all it still needs work.
The ending is still the weakest part of my poem. I liked my use of imagery when I juxtaposed the rosy pink of the nursery to the blood of the abortion but I think I over used it a little towards the end. I would like to eventually figure out a way to make the ending as strong as the beginning. I am still considering this poem a work in progress.
I am very pleased with "nursery rhymes" and, although it was a difficult endeavor, I enjoyed the writing process thoroughly. I wish we could do more poems instead of other papers, but I guess that's just a hopeless dream, (seeing that the semester is almost over). I will continue to look at "nursery rhymes" and try to find ways to make it different or better, but over all I think it's a poem I can be proud of.
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